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Swinglish series

  • 2017-05-08 13:18Business English, Swinglish series, Language

    Have you these common English mistakes on your LinkedIn profile?

    1. Spelling
    Don’t forget to use your spell check. Few things look as unprofessional as incorrect spelling and it’s so easy to correct by just remembering to use spell check.  Some of the most common mistakes we come across are  “Managment”, Responsable” and “Webb” (Correct spelling: “Management”, “Responsible” and “Web”).

    2. Use of capital letters
    Names should also have capital letters e.g. Stockholm University. The same applies to languages e.g English, Swedish (never “english” or “swedish”).

    3. Use of tense
    When describing previous roles, don’t forget to change the verbs to the past tense e.g. “was responsible for” instead of “am resposible for”.

    4. Misuse of the word “branch”
    “Bransch” in Swedish refers to an industry or business.
    “Branch” in English means filial or avdelningskontor.

    5. Incorrect translation of the word “kunskap”
    The literal translation of “kunskap” is “knowledge”, but this is often not the right word to use. Consider whether one of the following words would be a better fit:
    • Skills/Skills set
    • Competence
    • Experience
    • A solid grounding in
    • A solid understanding of
    • Information

    6.  Verb forms
    Few things are as grating to an English speaker as using the incorrect form of the verb e.g. “is” instead of “are” or “was” instead of “were”. It is also one of the most common mistakes that Swedes make in English and is prevalent even amongst those with a very high level of English.

    7. Describing groups
    Another typcial mistake made by Swedes is the description of how many people are involved in a group or project. For example “We are eight persons working on this project”.

    English: We are a team of eight working on this project/There are eight people working on the project/There are eight people involved in the project.

    Tip: Avoid saying ‘persons’. This word is not commonly used in English with few exceptions e.g. missing persons.

    If you would like help with proofreading job applications or your profile, please do not hesitate to contact us for a quote.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
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  • 2017-03-31 10:24Language, Swinglish series

    Moral or Morale?


    Both words look alike but are pronounced quite differently and have very different meanings.

    Moral

    A moral is a lesson learnt, usually from a story.
    Example 1: Children’s fairy tales often offer a moral.

    Moral is an adjective meaning ethical or virtuous.
    Example: She felt she had a moral victory when the case against her was dismissed.

    Morals
    are the standards someone adopts to determine right from wrong.
    Example 2: The company’s morals were called into question following their latest acquisition of environmentally hazardous production facilities.

    Morale

    Important: Unlike “moral”, the accent is on the second syllable in “morale" and it sounds like a longer word.

    Morale means mental or emotional state (e.g. spirit or attitude).
    Example 1: Staff morale is usually a major concern following the announcement of redundancies.
    Example 2: Team building events are considered to be good for building morale.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
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  • 2017-01-17 13:51Language, Swinglish series

    5 of the most common Swinglish mistakes


    Swedes often have a great command of English. However, as with all non-native speakers, they make mistakes. Our Swinglish series covers the most common Swinglish mistakes we come across. Getting these phrases right is a small adjustment but makes a big difference as they are used frequently and sound really wrong to an English native speaker.

    1. Swinglish: Eating medicine. E.g. I am eating penicillin at the moment.
    English: Taking medicine/ on medication E.g. I am taking penicillin at the moment/ I am on penicillin at the moment.

    2. Swinglish
    : Good/bad economy. E.g. I haven’t got a good economy at the moment as I’m out of work.
    English: Personal finances. E.g. My personal finances have taken a bit of a hit at the moment as I’m out of work or I’m not in good shape financially at the moment as I’m out of work.
    Note: Economy in English refers to something larger than one’s own personal finances, usually the economy of a country. Another meaning for economy is to be careful with money, e.g. to use economy when spending.

    3. Swinglish: What is the cost for something?
    English: What is the cost of something?

    4. Swinglish: Over-use of the word “possibility”. E.g. Would you have the possibility to do X?
    English: Try substituting one of these words instead: opportunity, chance, capability, capacity. Alternatively, you could simply use some form of “can”, e.g. “Could you do X?” or “Would you be able to do X?”

    5. Swinglish:
    Are you satisfied? (after a meal)
    English: Would you like some more?
    To ask if someone is satisfied with the food they have eaten is like asking them to make a judgement on the quality of the food rather than inquiring whether they would like some more.

    If you are having trouble with Swinglish and would like professional help, please do not hestiate to contact us.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test  to check your English level.
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  • 2015-11-17 12:05Swinglish series, Language

    Swedish sayings that need a little fine tuning in translation

    Our third article on Swedish proverbs, part of our “Borta med svengelska” series, looks at Swedish sayings that are very similar to English sayings but just need a little fine tuning in translation. Translation is a fine art so check out our previous articles on Swedish sayings that are guaranteed to confuse English speakers and 10 Swedish sayings that actually work in English. If you would like to follow our Swinglish series, don’t forget to follow our blog or like us on Facebook or LinkedIn to ensure you are kept updated.

    1. Borta bra men hemma bäst.
    "There is no place like home" or "East or west, home is best"
    2. Bäst att smida medan järnet är varm
    Strike while the iron is hot
    3. Bättre en fågel i handen än tio i skogen
    A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
    4. Delad glädje är dubbel glädje (och delad sorg är halv sorg)
    Joy shared, joy doubled (and sorrow shared, sorrow halved)
    5.  I krig och kärlek är allt tillåtet
    All is fair in love and war
    6.  Ju fler kockar desto sämre soppa
    Too many cooks spoil the broth
    If you need help with swinglish issues or guidance on professional international communications, please do not hesitate to contact us on tel.  +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
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  • 2015-11-11 13:35Language, Swinglish series

    10 Swedish sayings that actually work in English

    As part of our “Borta med svengelska” series we’ve turned the spotlight on Swedish proverbs. Sometimes life runs very smoothly and this article covers Swedish proverbs that work well in English too. However, this is not usually the case so check out our previous article on Swedish sayings that are guaranteed to confuse English speakers and don’t forget to follow our blog or like us on facebook or linkedin to make sure you catch the rest of the series.

    1. Allt är inte guld som glimmar
    All that glitters is not gold

    2. Barn gör som du gör, inte som du säger
    Children do as you do, not as you say

    3. Blod är tjockare än vatten
    Blood is thicker than water

    4 .Bättre sent än aldrig
    Better late than never

    5. Det är tanken som räknas
    It’s the thought that counts

    6. En kedja är inte starkare än dess svagaste länk
    A chain is only as strong as its weakest link

    7. En svala gör ingen sommar
    One swallow does not make a summer

    8. Gräset är alltid grönare på andra sidan
    The grass is always greener on the other side(of the hill)

    9. Ingen rök utan eld
    No smoke without fire

    10. Högmod går före fall
    Pride comes before a fall

    If you need help with swinglish issues or guidance on professional international communications, please do not hesitate to contact us on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
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  • 2015-10-26 11:20Business English, Language, Swinglish series

    10 Swedish sayings that are guaranteed to confuse English speakers

    Ever met by baffled expressions when you try to use Swedish sayings when speaking English? Using proverbs shows linguistic skill but can also go badly wrong. Some Swedish sayings are international while others just don’t translate at all to English. As part of our “Borta med svengelska” series we’ve compiled some Swedish proverbs that work in English as well those that don’t and those that just need a little translating polish to make them sound right. First up is a list of 10 Swedish proverbs that you should avoid altogether, or better still, learn the English equivalent if you would really like to impress. Don’t forget to like us on facebook and linkedin to make sure you catch the rest of the series.

    1. Gör inte en höna av en fjäder

    Direct translation: Don’t make a hen out of a feather
    English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill

    2. Lika barn lekar bäst

    Direct translation: Similar children play best
    English equivalent: Birds of a feather flock together

    3. Arga katter får rivet skinn

    Direct translation: Angry cats get scratched skin
    English equivalent: Quarrelsome dogs come limping home

    4. Smaken är som baken, delad
    Direct translation: Taste is like the buttocks, divided
    English equivalent: There’s no accounting for taste, or alternatively,Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

    5. Den enes död, den andres bröd

    Direct translation: The death of one, the bread of the other
    English equivalent: One man’s meat is another man’s poison

    6. Köp inte grisen i säcken

    Direct translation: Don’t buy the pig in the bag
    Closest English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one

    7. Lagt kort ligger

    Direct translation: Laid card lies
    English equivalent: You can’t un-ring a bell

    8. Eget beröm luktar illa
    Direct translation: Self-praise smells bad
    English equivalent: Don’t blow your own horn

    9. Först till kvarn får först mala
    Direct translation: First to the mill will grind first
    English equivalent: First come, first served

    10 Man ska inte döma hunden efter håren
    Direct translation: You should not judge a dog by its fur
    English equivalent: Never judge a book by its cover

    If you need help with swinglish issues or guidance on professional international communications, please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
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  • 2015-10-02 10:43Swinglish series, Language, Culture

    “Bort med svengelskan del 1-999….” – Red Days

    Swinglish: red day,
    English:
    bank holiday or public holiday

    Where does the term bank holiday come from?
    A bank holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom, some Commonwealth countries, other European countries such as Switzerland, and a colloquialism for a public holiday in Ireland. There is no automatic right to time off on these days, although banks close and the majority of the working population is granted time off work or extra pay for working on these days, depending on their contract.

    What’s the difference between a public holiday and a bank holiday?

    In England and Wales, a bank holiday tends automatically to be a public holiday and the day is generally observed as a holiday. In Scotland this may not always be the case.

    Regional differerences
    A handy list of national and regional Bank Holidays in the United Kingdom is provided below which shows regional differences.

    Mondays rule

    With few exceptions, Bank holidays are on Mondays. If a bank holiday is on a weekend, a ‘substitute’ weekday becomes a bank holiday, normally the following Monday.

    Don’t forget to check out the following list if you’re planning meetings or trips in the UK

    Upcoming bank holidays in England and Wales
    2015
    25 December Friday Christmas Day
    28 December Monday Boxing Day (substitute day)
    2016
    1 January Friday New Year’s Day
    25 March Friday Good Friday
    28 March Monday Easter Monday
    2 May Monday Early May bank holiday
    30 May Monday Spring bank holiday
    29 August Monday Summer bank holiday
    26 December Monday Boxing Day
    27 December Tuesday Christmas Day (substitute day)

    Upcoming bank holidays in Scotland
    2015
    30 November Monday St Andrew’s Day
    25 December Friday Christmas Day
    28 December Monday Boxing Day (substitute day)
    2016
    1 January Friday New Year’s Day
    4 January Monday 2nd January (substitute day)
    25 March Friday Good Friday
    2 May Monday Early May bank holiday
    30 May Monday Spring bank holiday
    1 August Monday Summer bank holiday
    30 November Wednesday St Andrew’s Day
    26 December Monday Boxing Day
    27 December Tuesday Christmas Day (substitute day)

    Upcoming bank holidays in Northern Ireland
    2015

    25 December Friday Christmas Day
    28 December Monday Boxing Day (substitute day)
    2016
    1 January Friday New Year’s Day
    17 March Thursday St Patrick’s Day
    25 March Friday Good Friday
    28 March Monday Easter Monday
    2 May Monday Early May bank holiday
    30 May Monday Spring bank holiday
    12 July Tuesday Battle of the Boyne (Orangemen’s Day)
    29 August Monday Summer bank holiday
    26 December Monday Boxing Day
    27 December Tuesday Christmas Day (substitute day)

    Do you need help with Swinglish issues or guidance on professional communications with the UK or internationally? Please do not hesitate to contact on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
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  • 2015-09-21 15:44Swinglish series

    "Bort med svengelskan del 1-999…."

    Today's theme is an old Swedish favourite: "first hand".

    Swinglish: My children come in first hand.
    English: My children come first.

    Swinglish: In the first hand I chose established brands.
    English: I prefer to chose established brands.

    Swinglish: We have already heard a lot of evidence, in first hand from many of the victims.
    English: We have already heard a lot of evidence, most importantly from many of the victims.

    Swinglish: We visited the factory and saw in first hand the problems that exist.
    English: We visited the factory and saw at first hand the problems that exist

    Need help with communicating professionally in English?
    Please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se
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  • 2015-03-09 13:28Swinglish series, Business English, Language

    5 Common Swinglish Mistakes on CVs


    English can be very tricky, especially when it’s important to get it right. This is particularly true when writing a CV. As the saying goes, you only get one chance to make a first impression. Short and condensed CVs require concise writing, which usually highlights translation errors. Use spellcheck tools wisely and, if possible, get a native English speaker to proofread your CV for you.

    1. Incorrect translation of the word “kunskap”

    The literal translation of “kunskap” is “knowledge”, but this is often not the right word to use. Consider whether one of the following words would be a better fit:
    • Skills/Skills set
    • Competence
    • Experience
    • A solid grounding in
    • A solid understanding of
    • Information

    2. Incorrect translation of the word “möjlighet”
    The direct translation of “possibility” is another word that is often incorrectly used on CVs and application letters. Consider the following options instead:
    • Ability
    • Opportunity
    • Chance
    • Capacity
    • Capability
    • Potential
    • Method
    • Way

    3. Prepositions
    Prepositions are usually one of the most challenging aspects of learning another language. One mistake, however, comes up time and time again on CVs when referring to results achieved; the use of the preposition “with” instead of “by”.

    Swinglish: Increased/decreased/raised/fell “with” X%
    English: Increased/decreased/raised/ fell “by” X%

    4. Misuse of the word “branch”
    “Bransch” in Swedish refers to an industry or business
    “Branch” in English means filial or avdelningskontor

    5. Overuse of the word “competence”
    The word “competence”, which is the direct translation of the Swedish word “kompetens” is not used at all as often in English as its Swedish counterpart. Try substituting one of the following words instead:
    • Skills
    • Skill set
    • Experience

    If you would like professional help with writing, editing or proofreading your CV or other English texts, please do not hesitate to contact us.  

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
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  • 2015-02-19 13:40Swinglish series, Business English

    5 basic Swinglish Mistakes to avoid on your CV


    Finding the right words and nuance are difficult when writing a CV in another language. However, there is no real excuse for basic mistakes, especially if you claim to command the language well enough to be considered for the job. We’ve listed some of the most common basic mistakes we come across when proofreading CVs.

    1. Days and months: The days of the week, Monday, Tuesday etc., and months of the year, January, February, March, etc., are ALWAYS written with capital letters.

    2. Names should also have capital letters e.g. Stockholm University

    3. Dates: add the word “in” when referring to dates. Swinglish: I was born 1970. English: I was born in 1970. Swinglish: 1990 I studied in London. English: In 1990, I studied in London.

    4. “Address” is written with two 'd’s.

    5. Verb forms: Few things are as grating to an English speaker as using the incorrect form of the verb e.g. “is” instead of “are” or “was” instead of “were”. It is also one of the most common mistakes that Swedes make in English and is prevalent even amongst those with a very high level of English.
    Tip: if you are using the third person singular (i.e. he/she/it), check that you have an “s” at the end of the verb, for example he/she/it writes. Other forms (i.e. I, you, we, they) do not have an “s” at the end of the verb,

    Don’t forget to check your LinkedIn profile for errors as this is just as important as any CV you send to prospective employers.

    If you would like professional help with writing, editing or proofreading your CV or other English texts, please do not hesitate to contact us.   

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
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