+46 (0) 8 5999 4000

Test

Business English

  • 2017-09-18 07:41Business English, Language

    Brexit basics - 10 terms you should know


    Brexit has been the focus of media attention and speculation for well over a year now. It’s also led to the creation of many new buzzwords. But what do they mean and how should they be used? Here’s a short guide to some Brexit basics to help clarify any confusion. The guide takes up 10 buzzwords and commonly used terms.

    1. Brexit
    This is the popular term for the prospective withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU), which was decided in a referendum held in the UK on 23 June 2016.

    2. Brexiteer

    A noun i.e. A person who is in favour of the United Kingdom withdrawing from the European Union. E.g. Brexiteers were delighted with the outcome of the referendum.

    3. Brexiting
    A verb e.g. UK citizens were able to vote on Brexiting in the referendum in 2016.

    4. Pulling a Brexit
    An adjective e.g. Other countries have been accused of trying to pull a Brexit (i.e. copy the UK’s actions)

    5. Hard(er) Brexit
    Media slang for a ‘complete Brexit’ trading deal between the EU-UK i.e. one that does not allow for the free movement of goods, services, capital and/or people.

    6. Soft(er) Brexit
    Media slang for a ‘less-than-a-complete Brexit’ trading deal between the EU-UK i.e. one that preserves the free movement of goods, services, capital and/or people.

    7. Brexit means Brexit

    A catch-cry to convey that the UK will go through with the process of leaving the EU and that there should be no backtracking on this intent.

    8. Brexpert

    Someone who claims to be an expert on what is happening and the likely outcomes of Brexit.

    9. Invoke
    Meaning: To use a law in order to achieve something. E.g. On 29 March 2017, the British government invoked Article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union. The UK is thus on course to leave the EU by March 2019.

    10. Revoke
    Meaning: To officially cancel. E.g. Revoking article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union might be legally possible.

    Need help with formulating a Brexit policy or response for your organisation?

    Please don’t hesitate to contact us for professional communication advice.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.

    info
  • 2017-09-06 13:55Business English, How to series

    How to translate your job title

    Translating your job title to English is often far from straight forward. Not only can it be tricky to find an exact equivalent, it can also be quite a loaded question politically. Status issues and other problems often arise when people inflate their titles in translation, whether deliberately or unintentionally.

    Creative thinking or playing it safe?
    Receptionist or help desk manager? MD's assistant or Chief Operating Officer? For the sake of clarity,  what you call yourself is usually best aligned with the norms of the sector you work in, both nationally and in the international market(s) that are relevant to you. A little time spent doing some research is usually time well spent.

    New jobs - new challenges
    Innovation brings its own set of translation challenges. A lot of jobs that people have today just didn't exist 10 year ago, leaving a lot of room for creative thinking and translation. LinkedIn is a wonderful resource for benchmarking and discovering job titles.

    35 new job titles for the Higher Education sector
    A good example of translation challenges is the work carried out on the new digital  Swedish- English dictionary by the Swedish Council for Higher Education (Universitets- och högskolerådet) which recently confirmed 35 new job titles  for the Higher Education sector. The dictionary was commissioned by the government to assist with the internationalisation of higher education. New job titles confirmed in this dictionary included:

    Företagsdoktorand – Externally employed doctoral student
    Vice dekan – Vice dean
    Timlärare – Part-time fixed-term teacher

    International variation
    It's good to be aware of variations in the use of titles between English speaking countries. America, for example has a strong preference for the term "Vice President". A Vice President of Marketing in the USA is more likely to be a Marketing Manager or Marketing Director in England.

    Some standard translations
    Here's a list of some common translations which we hope you find useful but please do not hesitate to contact us if you need help.

     Account Manager = Kundansvarig
     Art Director, AD = Reklamformgivare
     Business Analyst = Affärsanalytiker
     Chief Executive Officer, CEO = Verkställande direktör, vd
     Chief Financial Officer, CFO = Finansdirektör, ekonomichef
     Copywriter, Copy = Reklamskribent
     Creative Director, CD = Konstnärlig ledare, kreativt ansvarig
     Chief Marketing Officer, CMO = Marknadschef, marknadsdirektör
     Chief Communications Officer, CCO = Kommunikationschef
     Chief Investment Officer, CIO = Investeringsdirektör
     Chief Information Officer, CIO = IT-chef, informationschef
     Chief Innovation Officer, CINO = Innovationsdirektör
     Chief Operating Officer/President = Operativ chef
     Chief Technology Officer, CTO = Utvecklingsansvarig
     Director of Development = Utvecklingschef, utvecklingsansvarig
     Director of Finance = Ekonomichef
     Human Resources Director, HR Dir = Personalansvarig, personalchef
     Internal Auditor = Internrevisor
     Information Technology Director = IT-chef
     Key Account Manager, KAM = Storkundsansvarig
     Managing Director = Verkställande direktör, vd
     Production Manager = Driftchef
     Sales Manager = Säljansvarig, säljchef
     Senior Administrative Officer = Byrådirektör
     Senior Clerical Officer = Byråassistent
     Senior Legal Adviser = Chefsjurist
     Systems Engineering Consultant = Systemingenjör
     Systems Manager = Systemadministratör
     Tele Communications Administrator = Teleadministratör


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-08-28 13:16Business English, Language

    Which English words should you never use on your CV?

    Recruiters often spend less than 30 seconds scanning a CV before deciding to move on to the next applicant. With such a short time to make a good impression, you need to rigorously edit your CV. We’ve put together a list of overused buzzwords and words which create a rather boastful impression to help you with the editing process.  

    8 overused words that make recruiters yawn

    1. Results-driven
    2. Team player
    3. Driven
    4. Hard worker
    5. Strategic thinker
    7. Self-motivated
    8. Detail-oriented

    It's far better to describe your accomplishments specifically. Use words like “improved” and “created” and provide a specific explanation of exactly what you did, including numbers whenever possible. In other words, instead of saying you are results-driven, show the results you achieved.

    8 boastful words you should remove from your CV

    1. Innovative
    2. Dynamic
    3. Savvy
    4. Smart
    5. Talented
    6. Well rounded
    7. Well balanced
    8. Visionary

    The common denominator in all these words is that they are “praising adjectives”, i.e. words we hope others would use about us but which are not a good idea to use about ourselves.

    Need help with writing or editing your CV in English?

    Please do not hesitate to contact us.  

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-08-21 08:19Language, Business English, Grammar

    10 English mistakes that can ruin your professional image

    It’s easy to make mistakes, even simple ones. Saying or presenting something incorrectly is bad enough but publishing flawed content online increases the potential exposure of your mistake enormously, which can lead to serious embarrassment.

    Most of us instinctively shy away from using words we feel unsure of, especially if they are not commonly used or seem complicated. However, it’s the words that we think we’re using correctly that can really ruin our image. The following simple mistakes are also made by a lot of native English speakers.

    1. Teach Vs Learn
    You can teach yourself or other people but you cannot learn other people. People learn things themselves, which they can then teach to others.

    2. There/their/they’re
    These words sound the same but have different meanings.
    • Use “there” to refer to a place that isn’t here – “over there”.
    • We also use “there” to state something – “There are no chairs in the room”.
    • “Their” indicates possession – something belonging to them, e.g. "their books are new".
    • “They’re” is short for “they are” e.g ."they’re very happy to be on holiday".

    3. I.e. and e.g.
    I.e. is the abbreviation for “that is to say” and is used to add explanatory information.
    Example: A synthetic shoe i.e. not made from leather.
    E.g. is the abbreviation for “for example”.
    Example: He loves fruit and vegtables  e.g. apples and carrots.

    4. Me/myself/I
    • When referring to yourself and someone else, put their name first in the sentence e.g. John and I are going to the cinema (Not “John and me are going to the cinema” or “Myself and John are going to the cinema” or “Me and John are going to the cinema”).
    • You only use “myself” if you’ve already used “I”, making you the subject of the sentence e.g. “I’ll do it myself” or “I thought to myself”.

    5. Your/you’re
    “You’re” is short for the two words “you are”. The apostrophe stands for the omitted “a” of “are”.
    E.g. You’re going to enjoy this.
    “Your” is a possessive determiner and pronoun which means “belonging to you”.
    E.g. What’s your name?

    6. Its/it’s
    The difference between these two words gets lots of people confused. Apostrophes should be used to indicate possession, but there is one exception to this rule, and that is the word “it”.
    • “It’s” is usually used  short for “it is” e.g . "it’s raining". (Note:" It’s" is also short for "It has", e.g. it’s been a while…)
    • “Its” indicates something belonging to something that isn’t masculine or feminine (like “his” and “hers”). E.g .the book looks great with its new cover.

    7. Then/than
    Confusion between “then” and “than” probably arises because the two look and sound similar.
    • “Than” is used in comparisons e.g. “ John is taller than Jack” or “ It was more than enough”
    • “Then” is used to indicate something following something else in time, as in step-by-step instructions, or planning a schedule “we’ll go to the cinema first and then to the restaurant”.

    8. Affect vs. Effect
    This is another easy enough mistake to make given how similar these two words look and sound, but there’s a simple explanation to help you remember the difference.
    • Affect is a verb – “to affect” – meaning to influence or have an impact on something. E.g. He hoped the company’s excellent results would have a positive effect on his salary.
    • Effect is the noun – “a positive/negative effect” – referring to the result of being affected by something. E.g his job was directly affected by the organisational change.
    • There is also a verb “to effect”, meaning to bring something about – “to effect a change” but this is not commonly used.

    9. Farther vs. Further

    • Farther refers to physical distance, while further describes the degree or extent of an action or situation. “I can’t run any farther,” but “I have nothing further to say.”
    • If you can substitute “more” or “additional,” use "further".

    10. Imply/Infer

    To imply means to suggest something without saying it outright e.g. "The reporter implied the politician was lying, without explicitly stating it". To infer means to draw a conclusion from what someone else implies e.g." From the facts in this report we can infer that there is a property bubble". As a general rule, the speaker/writer implies, and the listener/reader infers.

    One mistake can be dismissed as a typo but making the same simple mistakes repeatedly looks very unprofessional. We strongly recommend getting someone to proofread important presentations and documents. Please feel free to contact us for a professional proofreading quote. You are also very welcome to follow us on LinkedIn or Facebook for regular updates and English language advice.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-06-15 00:00How to series, Business English

    Nice ways to say no & offload before your holidays


    Feeling overextended and under pressure as you try to get on top of things before your summer holidays? Here are some helpful tips on how to politely say no at work. At the very least, they should help you win some time, allowing you to postpone until after the summer.

    1. My plate is really full with x and y at the moment. Let me know if you want me to re-prioritize.

    2. I’m so sorry. I’ve already committed to another meeting that day.

    3. I'm afraid I can't volunteer for that as I'm over-committed at the moment but let's see if we can delegate or outsource this.

    4. If you email me the details, I can get back to you with a more definite time frame.

    5. Unfortunately this is a really hectic time for me at the moment and I cannot take on any more commitments.

    6. I'm sorry but I make it a rule to prioritize my family over the holidays.

    7. I can't do this but I can do x (a lesser commitment).

    8. I would love to help you out but it wouldn't be fair to other projects I've already committed to.

    9. I'm afraid that's not my area of expertise but I can connect you to someone who can help.

    10. I really appreciate you thinking of me but I'm not in a position to give that project the attention it deserves at the moment.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-05-24 07:32Culture, Business English, Language

    The Swedish holiday calendar in English


    The months of May and June offer a host of occasions to celebrate and lots of public holidays.  But what is “Kristi himmelfärdsdag” in English and what are the big occasions called? Here’s a useful overview of all the standard Swedish holidays in English.

    Jan 1      Sunday             New Year’s Day
    Jan 5     Thursday           Twelfth Night (Trettondagsafton)
    Jan 6     Friday                Epiphany (Trettondedag jul)
    Apr 14   Friday               Good Friday
    Apr 15   Saturday           Holy Saturday
    Apr 16   Sunday             Easter Day
    Apr 17   Monday            Easter Monday
    Apr 30   Sunday             Walpurgis Night (Valborgsmässoafton)
    May 1    Monday            May Day/Early May bank holiday
    May 25  Thursday          Ascension Day (Kristi himmelfärdsdag)
    May 28  Sunday             Mother’s Day
    June 3    Saturday           Pentecost Eve
    June 4    Sunday             Whit Sunday /Pentecost Sunday (Pingstdagen)
    June 6    Tuesday            Swedish National Day
    June 23  Friday               Midsummer Eve
    June 24  Saturday           Midsummer Day
    Nov 3     Friday              All Saints’ Eve
    Nov 4     Saturday          All Saints’ Day
    Nov 12    Sunday            Father’s Day
    Dec 24    Sunday            Christmas Eve
    Dec 25    Monday           Christmas Day
    Dec 26   Tuesday            Boxing Day
    Dec 31    Sunday             New Year’s Eve

    What’s a bank holiday?
    A bank holiday is the British equivalent of a “röd dag” in Swedish

    Where does the term bank holiday come from?

    A bank holiday is a public holiday in the United Kingdom, some Commonwealth countries, other European countries such as Switzerland, and a colloquialism for a public holiday in Ireland. There is no automatic right to time off on these days, although banks close and the majority of the working population is granted time off work or extra pay for working on these days, depending on their contract.

    What’s the difference between a public holiday and a bank holiday?

    In England and Wales, a bank holiday tends automatically to be a public holiday and the day is generally observed as a holiday. In Scotland this may not always be the case.

    Mondays rule

    With few exceptions, Bank holidays are on Mondays. If a bank holiday is on a weekend, a ‘substitute’ weekday becomes a bank holiday, normally the following Monday.

    UK Bank Holidays 2017
    Please note that there are quite a number of differences between British and Swedish public holidays. If you are planning a trip or an important meeting with British colleagues or customers, it’s a good idea to check the UK holiday calendar first.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-05-17 00:00How to series, Business English

    How to ace your interview in English


    Congratulations! You have applied for a new job and been called to interview. But the interview is going to be in English!!! Being interviewed in another language is a challenge for most people. The good news, however, is that it’s all in the preparation. Here are our top tips for preparing for your interview.

    1. Practise answering questions out loud
    This is crucial. How something sounds in your mind and how it actually sounds when you say it can be very different.

    2. Check pronunciation
    Make sure you know how to pronounce keywords related to the job and industry and check out the word stress of important words so you really sound like you know what you are talking about. If you mispronounce important words, it gives the impression that you are not familiar with the topic. Google translate offers a very useful tool for this which allows you to listen to the word you have written.

    3. Prepare well for standard questions
    Most interviewers use a fairly standard list of questions. This is your biggest advantage as it is easy to prepare and have the perfect answer ready. Prepare a detailed list of answers to all the standard interview questions you can think of, for example
    - Tell me about yourself
    - What are your strengths and weaknesses?
    - Where do you see yourself in 5 years time?

    4. Remember, relevance is key
    Let’s take the classic interview question of “Tell me about yourself”. The perfect answer to this question focuses on education, experience and skills, not personal history, hobbies or interests. In preparing for this question from a language point of view, you also have the opportunity to really craft the right answer in terms of relevant content.

    5. Work on detail

    You might be shy about saying complicated things in English. However, this is absolutely necessary as the employer is looking for an employee who knows his or her job. It is more important to the employer that you can describe the job in detail in English than that you make a few language mistakes.

    Best of luck with your interview and watch out for the second part of this article with more interview tips.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-05-08 13:18Business English, Swinglish series, Language

    Have you these common English mistakes on your LinkedIn profile?

    1. Spelling
    Don’t forget to use your spell check. Few things look as unprofessional as incorrect spelling and it’s so easy to correct by just remembering to use spell check.  Some of the most common mistakes we come across are  “Managment”, Responsable” and “Webb” (Correct spelling: “Management”, “Responsible” and “Web”).

    2. Use of capital letters
    Names should also have capital letters e.g. Stockholm University. The same applies to languages e.g English, Swedish (never “english” or “swedish”).

    3. Use of tense
    When describing previous roles, don’t forget to change the verbs to the past tense e.g. “was responsible for” instead of “am resposible for”.

    4. Misuse of the word “branch”
    “Bransch” in Swedish refers to an industry or business.
    “Branch” in English means filial or avdelningskontor.

    5. Incorrect translation of the word “kunskap”
    The literal translation of “kunskap” is “knowledge”, but this is often not the right word to use. Consider whether one of the following words would be a better fit:
    • Skills/Skills set
    • Competence
    • Experience
    • A solid grounding in
    • A solid understanding of
    • Information

    6.  Verb forms
    Few things are as grating to an English speaker as using the incorrect form of the verb e.g. “is” instead of “are” or “was” instead of “were”. It is also one of the most common mistakes that Swedes make in English and is prevalent even amongst those with a very high level of English.

    7. Describing groups
    Another typcial mistake made by Swedes is the description of how many people are involved in a group or project. For example “We are eight persons working on this project”.

    English: We are a team of eight working on this project/There are eight people working on the project/There are eight people involved in the project.

    Tip: Avoid saying ‘persons’. This word is not commonly used in English with few exceptions e.g. missing persons.

    If you would like help with proofreading job applications or your profile, please do not hesitate to contact us for a quote.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-04-24 15:01Language, Business English

    10 over-used buzzwords you should give up


    Few things irritate in a meeting or presentation as much as cliché buzzwords and metaphors. You may feel clever spouting newly acquired English business jargon but it can also be extremely annoying for your audience.
    Here are 10 phrases that we recommend you steer clear of if you want to avoid people grinding their teeth. Try to catch yourself before your audience starts to wince.

    1. Think outside the box
    Alternative: It’s time to get creative

    2. Get the ball rolling

    Alternative: Let’s get started

    3. Let’s touch base
    Alternative: I’ll contact you tomorrow

    4. Win-win
    Alternative: We can all really benefit from this

    5. Low hanging fruit
    Alternative: It makes sense to start with the easiest options

    6. It’s on my radar
    Alternative: I’m aware of this or I’m on top of this

    7. Take it to the next level
    Alternative: Move forward/ahead

    8. Paradigm shift
    Alternative: A very significant change

    9. No-brainer
    Alternative: An easy decision

    10. Move the needle
    Alternative: To make real progress/To make a real difference

    If you would like help with jargon free and crystal clear communication in English, please do not hesitate to contact us. Whether you need coaching for an important presentation, editing services or creative copywriting, we can help.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-04-06 09:51How to series, Business English, Language

    Backtracking and backing down in English

    Following on from our article The art of denial, we’ve put together a short guide and some useful phrases to help you communicate in English when you need to back down or backtrack, difficult situations which sometime arise when mistakes have been made or a situation has been misjudged.  

    Backtrack

    Meaning: To reverse a position.
    Example: He was forced to backtrack on previous statements.

    Distance
    Example: She is trying to distance herself from the problem to avoid further complications.

    Offer
    Example 1: I have offered to clarify my previous comments.
    Example 2: Of course we will offer to look into the matter.
    Example 3: They are going to offer a full explanation.

    Retract

    Meaning: To take back.
    Example: He is willing to retract his previous claims.

    Tone down
    Example 1: It would be a good idea to tone down your argument in this situation.
    Example 2: She tried to tone things down by calling their reaction a simple misunderstanding.

    Upcoming articles


    Look out for our upcoming article “How to come clean in English – the art of confession”.

    Previous articles


    You may also be interested in the following articles:
    Nice words for mistakes
    Nice words for problems
    Alternative words for alternative facts

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-04-03 08:24Language, Business English

    The art of denial


    The new political era has seen unprecedented instances of denial, side-stepping and “alternative facts”. Although current political discourse sometimes appears to have moved to a parallel reality, mistakes do sometimes genuinely occur in political, business and everyday life. Dealing with these situations in another language can be very stressful. We’ve put together a short guide to help you communicate in English in challenging circumstances.

    Claim
    Example 1: She claimed that the accusation was unproven

    Deny
    Example: He denied all knowledge or involvement

    Disagree

    Example: I disagree with the conclusions

    Dismiss
    Example: They dismissed the claim as groundless

    Refute (Meaning: to deny/contradict or to prove that someone is wrong)
    Example: Defence lawyers refuted the evidence presented

    Reject
    Example: I (fully) reject the accusations

    Repudiate (Meaning: to refuse to accept/to reject)
    Example: The company repudiated the report’s claims

    Upcoming articles


    Look out for the following related upcoming articles:
    -How to come clean in English – the art of confession
    -Backtracking and backing down in English

    Previous articles


    You may also be interested in the following articles
    -Nice words for mistakes
    -Nice words for problems
    -Alternative words for alternative facts

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-03-16 11:55Business English, Language

    Alternative words for “alternative facts”

    To "call a spade a spade" is a figurative expression which refers to calling something "as it is", that is, by its right or proper name, truthfully, frankly, and directly, even to the point of being blunt or rude, and even if the subject is considered coarse, impolite or unpleasant.

    Tragically, certain political rhetoric seems limitless when it comes to exaggeration or untruths. Sometimes, however, it is expedient to practise caution in calling something an outright lie. The following alternatives allow you to choose a more measured and nuanced approach when necessary.

    Nice words for alternative facts
    Mistakes, inaccuracies, flaws, fibs (less serious lies), white lies, confusion

    A common euphemism is “being economical with the truth”. However this implies leaving out important information rather than inaccurate or false information.

    Uncensored alternatives

    Lies, falsehoods, untruths, distortions, fiction, fabrication, misinformation, disinformation

    Need help with sensitive texts?

    Please do not hesitate to contact us for expert advice on all your international communication. Whether you need help with a presentation, report or website, we can help you to set the right tone and communicate effectively.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.

    info
  • 2017-03-08 15:51Language, Business English, Courses

    Popular Intercultural and Communication Skills Courses in London 2017


    The London School of International Communication offers a broad selection of popular intercultural and communication skills courses for 2017. These courses are held at its training centre in Holland Park, London, and attended by individuals from a wide range of organisations and professions.  

    Developing Intercultural Competence
    Build stronger relationships with colleagues and partners from other backgrounds and cultures.
    18 - 19 October
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/intercultural/developing-intercultural-competence/

    International Email Writing
    Write clear and effective business emails that are quickly understood and actioned by clients and colleagues anywhere in the world.
    3 April, 2 October
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/communication/email-writing/

    International Presentation Skills Training

    Become a more confident presenter and learn new techniques for engaging with international audiences.
    9 May, 17 October
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/communication/presentation-skills-training/

    Professional Writing Skills
    Improve your ability to produce accurate, clear and reader-friendly written communication.
    17 May, 4 October, 25 November
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/communication/professional-writing-skills/

    Facilitating International Meetings

    Discover solutions to the challenges and frustrations of facilitating international meetings and learn practical communication techniques for working with a multicultural audience.
    26 May, 3 October
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/communication/meeting-facilitation-training/

    International Negotiation Skills Training
    Develop your own negotiation style, learn how to interpret the cultural nuances affecting negotiations and practise tried and tested negotiation skills and tactics.
    21 March, 19 May, 20 October
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/communication/negotiation-skills-training/

    Working across Cultures
    Develop your intercultural sensitivity and global skills so that you can build more effective relationships and communicate more efficiently with contacts from other cultures.
    20 March, 18 May, 11 September, 13 November
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/intercultural/cross-cultural/

    Working with the British

    Learn to understand the British mindset and know how to adapt to British business culture.
    8 May, 5 June, 20 November
    https://www.lsictraining.com/courses/intercultural/british-culture/

    Course customisation

    Customisation of the above courses and delivery  at your organisation is also possible to arrange.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-03-01 14:48Language, Business English

    15 positive expressions in English to confirm your progress


    Have you managed to move ahead with your goals for 2017?

    Perhaps you’re working on a new project, making progress on your sales budget or in the process of building a new team?  Whatever your goal, whether it’s within a current role or you’re looking for a new job, it’s good to be able to confirm that you are making progress. We’ve put together some positive expressions that you can use when you need to communicate about working towards your goals.

    1. We’re starting to build up/create some momentum
    2. The project is steadily moving forward
    3. We’re moving ahead and making progress
    4. I’m on track to meet all my deadlines
    5. We’re starting to gain traction in this market
    6. I’ve got some wind in my sails
    7. We’re building up steam
    8. We’re seeing some promising signs on the market
    9. It’s full steam ahead with the project
    10. I’ve made clear/good/great/excellent progress this year
    11. We’ve seen some clear signs of improvement
    12. We’ve really managed to get the show on the road
    13. I’m now well underway
    14. The project is really up and running now
    15. The project is now firmly established

    Good luck with your goals for 2017! And if you’ve already made progress and are on a well-deserved sports break this week, congratulations and enjoy!

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-02-16 14:07Language, Business English

    Encouragement and positive feedback for your colleagues

    Do your colleagues need a few words of encouragement to lift their spirits? Would you like to expand your vocabulary beyond “Good job”?  Words really do have the power to build people up and there’s nothing like properly qualified feedback to express your admiration and gratitude for a job well done. Here’s a handy list of expressions that you can use to describe the act of giving encouragement and to provide positive feedback, an essential element of good communication.

    9 ways of encouraging your colleagues


    1. Spur
    Example: To spur your colleagues on
    2. Praise
    Example: To praise their efforts
    3. Boost
    Example: To boost their confidence/ To boost staff morale
    4. Support
    Example: To support people’s ideas
    5. Inspire
    Example: To inspire your colleagues to reach their goals
    6. Reassure
    Example: To reassure people that they can meet their objectives
    7. Buoy
    Example: To help buoy up staff in the face of challenges
    8. Prop
    Example: To prop up your colleagues in difficult times
    9. Pep
    Example: To give a pep talk

    10 new expressions for giving positive feedback


    1. Well done!
    2. Nice work!*
    3. Good stuff!
    4. Impressive work!*
    5. Very professional!
    6. Great job!*
    7. First class!
    8. Tremendous work!*
    9. Cracking performance!*
    10. Excellent contribution!*

    Qualifiers

    The following qualifiers can be used interchangeably with all of the expressions above which are marked with an asterisk *. Note: They are presented in order of the strength of the praise to be given, although it’s rather difficult to distinguish between the strength of the last four.

    • Nice
    • Good
    • Impressive
    • Great
    • Excellent
    • Fantastic
    • Brilliant
    • Magnificent


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.

    info
  • 2017-02-06 09:08Business English, Language

    5 new ways to ask for help

    Tired of asking for help? Why not try a different approach or at least re-name what you are looking for. Re-phrasing what you need might just work. Asking politely and subtly is rarely a bad idea and can even help you to build bridges.

    1. A hand
    Example: We would really appreciate it if you could lend a hand today.

    2. Assistance
    Example: A little assistance would be great.

    3. Support

    Example: Any chance of getting a bit of support?

    4. Hands on deck
    Example: A few more hands on deck would be good to get things moving.

    5. Reinforcement
    Example: We could really do with some reinforcement on this project.


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2017-01-16 14:32Language, Business English

    10 words to use instead of “busy”

    Are you tired of being busy? Why not try a new word or an expression which describes your level of busyness a little more precisely. Here are some alternatives which allow you to better express exactly how busy you are and how soon you are likely to be available.  There is, after all, a world of difference between being “a little tied up” and being “completely snowed under”.

    10 alternative expressions

    1. Tied up

    Example: I’m a little tied up with this new project

    2. Occupied
    Example: She’s a bit occupied today dealing with new staff

    3. Overstretched
    Example: He’s slightly overstretched at the moment

    4. Over-extended

    Example: She’s quite over-extended in this particular role

    5. Overloaded
    Example: We’re rather overloaded with all these new cases

    6. Swamped
    Example: They’ve been completely swamped with new customers this week

    7. Snowed under

    Example: He’s been snowed under with complaints

    8. To have enough/rather a lot/too much on one’s plate at the moment

    (Meaning: To have too much to do)

    9. To have other/bigger fish to fry

    (Meaning: to be busy with more important things to do)

    10. To have other priorities today/this week /this month

    (Meaning: to be busy with more important things)

    Use Qualifiers for greater precision


    Note: The following qualifiers can be used interchangeably with expressions 1- 7 above
    • A little
    • A bit
    • Slightly
    • Quite
    • Rather
    • Completely

    Declining politely


    You may also be interested in reading our article on Nice ways to say no, which provides some very useful expressions for when you are too busy to take on anything new.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level


    info
  • 2017-01-03 10:19Business English, Language

    Is your English fit for 2017?

    A new year is upon us presenting a fresh set of challenges and opportunities. Will your English be a help or hindrance in the year to come?

    Want a fast and free analysis?
    Welcome to our Online English Level Test. This test takes just 20 minutes to complete and provides immediate feedback on your level of English.  Your test results are kept fully confidential.

    Hoping to get a new job this year?
    Putting together a CV will be your first challenge. Have a look at "5 Common Swinglish Mistakes on CVs" before you submit yours. You might also want to check out "How to ace your interview in English" and some of our other blog articles designed to help you with your job hunting.  

    Planning to visit friends abroad?
    Don't miss our articles on "How to be a great guest in English" if you're travelling abroad or even if you're just spending time with English speakers here in Sweden.  They will help you to avoid some common social pitfalls.

    Is improving your English a resolution on repeat?
    Wanting to improve your English is a great new year's resolution. It's easy to want to improve but the follow-through can seem like a lot of work and commitment. Starting a course or getting a personal language trainer usually makes all the difference. Why not give us a call or check out our services to help you take action on your resolution.  Our business is helping you to achieve your goals in English.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-12-07 08:22Business English, Language

    20 Christmas greetings in English for your business contacts


    Wondering what's the best way to wish your business contacts a Happy Christmas? From short and sweet to a little more nuanced, we've put together our top 20 Christmas greetings to provide you with a variety of greeting options for your Christmas cards, emails and social media.

    Popular standard greetings

    1. Happy Christmas  
    2. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
    3. Merry Christmas and Best Wishes for a Happy New Year

    A little less formal

    4. Merry Christmas and all the best in the New Year

    Suitable for all religions

    5. Season’s Greetings
    6. Holiday Greetings
    7. Happy Holidays
    8. Season’s Greetings and best wishes for the New Year
    9. Holiday Greetings with all good wishes for the New Year
    10. Greetings of the Season and Best Wishes for the New Year
    11. Warmest thoughts and best wishes for a wonderful Holiday and a Happy New Year
    12. Wishing you every happiness this Holiday Season and throughout the coming year

    Incorporating a business angle
    13. Season’s Greetings from all of us at [name of company]
    14. Best wishes for a Happy Christmas and a prosperous New Year
    15. All of us at [name of company] join in sending season's greetings with good wishes for the New Year
    16. In warm appreciation of our association during the past year, we wish you a Merry Christmas and every success in the New Year
    17. With thanks for our fruitful cooperation during the past year, we wish you a very Merry Christmas and look forward to continuing our joint success in the New Year
    18. All of us at [name of company] join in saying “thank you” and wishing you a happy holiday and prosperous new year
    19. With thanks for our successful partnership this year, we wish you all a very Happy Christmas and look forward to working with you in the New Year.
    20. In warm appreciation of all your hard work this year, we wish you a very happy and relaxing Christmas and look forward to working with you in 2016.

    What not to say
    Happy Christmas and a Merry New Year ("Merry New Year" just sounds wrong)
    Wishing you a prosperous Christmas and a merry New Year ("Prosperous Christmas" sounds even more wrong)

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-12-01 14:28Language, Business English

    10 words to use instead of important


    There are few things as tedious as hearing or reading the same word over and over again and the word “important” is used frequently in business and working life. Why not expand your vocabulary by learning and applying synonyms for this common word . It will help you avoid repeating yourself and it’s a great opportunity to showcase your English language skills.

    1. Critical

    Example: Positive results are critical for success.

    2. Crucial

    Example: Their behaviour has a crucial impact on the outcome.

    3. Essential

    Example: Only essential team members have to work at the weekend.

    4. Imperative

    Example: It is imperative that you understand what needs to be done, if this project is to succeed.

    5. Paramount

    Example: The interests of the children should be paramount in divorce
    and custody cases.

    6. Urgent

    Example: Please let them know that this is an urgent matter.

    7. Decisive

    Example: Your argument was the decisive one.

    8. Meaningful

    Example: It’s unclear whether their input had any meaningful effect on the result.

    9. Significant

    Example: The findings of the report are very significant.

    10. Influential

    Example: Her opinion is very influential and may change the direction of the project.

    Need help with texts or presentations?

    We have extensive experience of English language coaching as well as writing and editing professional English texts. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition and editing services.
    info
  • 2016-11-29 14:06Business English, Language

    Nice words for problems

    Problems are a normal part of life and the ability to communicate about them diplomatically can build or break relationships.  We've put together some useful synonyms and smart tactics for softening the blow of announcing that problems exist, which should help avoid negativity and will also help showcase your English language skills.

    6 Alternative words
    • Difficulty
    • Challenge
    • Hitch
    • Setback
    • Hurdle
    • Complication

    Use modifiers

    Using modifiers like “slight”, “little”, “a bit of”, “minor” and “a few” also help to soften and diminish the effect of the words you choose.

    Examples
    • There’s been a slight hitch
    • We’ve had a bit of a setback
    • There’s been a minor complication

    Classic euphemisms
    The classic euphemisms for "problems" are "challenges" or "opportunities".

    Alternative strategy
    An alternative strategy is to avoid mentioning the word “problem” entirely, or any word with a negative connotation, by focusing on what needs to be done instead.

    • Example 1: These are the areas that we need to focus on.
    • Example 2: This is what requires our immediate attention.
    • Example 3: What are the steps we need to take to get things back on track?
    • Example 4: How do we turn the matter at hand around?

    Crisis management communication
    Problems are commonplace.  The communication surrounding crisis management and damage limitation, however, is extremely sensitive and each word needs to be carefully considered. Please do not hesitate to call us if you need professional help with this or any other form of international communication.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-10-18 14:33Language, Business English

    Nice words for mistakes


    "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.” – Albert Einstein. Mistakes happen all the time, especially when you’re dealing with people, so it’s a good idea to learn a few handy phrases which help you to contain and deliver the bad news. The following “nice words” for mistakes and problems should help you to soften the blow when they occur.

    1. Hiccup
    Example: I’m afraid we’ve had a few hiccups with this project.

    2. Slip-up

    Example: There was a little slip-up in the presentation.

    3. Mix-up

    Example: There’s been a bit of a mix up with the figures.

    4. Miscalculation
    Example: Unfortunately there was a slight miscalculation in the programme.

    5. Teething problems

    Example: We’re experiencing a few teething problems with the launch.

    6. Oversight
    Example: I wonder if there has been a minor oversight with invitiations to the meeting.

    7. Wobble
    Example: He had a slight wobble today.

    Important: Using modifiers like “slight”, “little”, “a bit of”, “minor” and “a few” also help to soften and diminish the effect of the words you choose.

    Crisis management communication
    Small mistakes are commonplace.  The communication surrounding crisis management and damage limitation, however,  is extremely sensitive and each word needs to be carefully considered. Please do not hesitate to call us if you need professional help with this or any other form of international communication.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-10-10 10:52How to series, Business English

    How to ask for a salary increase in English


    Have you an annual performance review or salary negotiation coming up soon? If not, perhaps it’s time to book a meeting to discuss your compensation. Make sure you prepare properly for the meeting by planning exactly what you are going to say to negotiate a pay increase.

    Arrange a meeting

    If performance appraisal meetings aren’t usually scheduled at your workplace, write to your boss to request such a meeting. You could word this request as follows:

    “I would appreciate the opportunity to meet to discuss a performance review. Could you please let me know when might be a convenient time for you?

    Make your case
    Outline why you deserve extra pay. Have you helped make a profit for your company? If so, this is usually the best basis for negotiating a pay rise. To make your case, highlight exactly how you have contributed. Perhaps you can claim some of the following sample contributions:

    • I have brought in new customers
    • I have helped improve productivity
    • I have taken on extra responsibilities
    • I have achieved/exceeded my budget goals
    • I have successfully completed key projects for the company

    Be specific
    Not only should you clearly outline the reasons you deserve a higher salary, you should also request a specific amount to help guide your boss in the right direction.
    Example 1: I’m looking for an increase of X kr or X %.
    Example 2: I believe that an increase/ a bonus of X kr or X% would be appropriate.

    Justify the amount you ask for

    Once you have made your case and specified how much you are looking for, you can end your proposal with one of the following statements or something similar.

    • It reflects the extra profit I have made for the company
    • My proposal reflects the savings that I have made
    • I think this would be fair recognition of the new accounts I have brought to the company
    • I believe this is appropriate as it is in line with current pay levels for someone in my position in   this business/industry.
    • I have done some research and someone in my position usually earns about xxx

    If you get a negative response
    If your boss does not or cannot agree to your new salary proposal, try to negotiate non-salary benefits or to agree a new meeting at some point in the future. Here are some suggestions: by using some of the following suggestions.

    • I understand that company finances are rather stretched at the moment. Can we discuss non-salary perks?
    • Can we discuss other benefits in lieu of a pay increase?
    • Is it possible to look at other forms of compensation instead?
    • What can I do over the next few months to make myself eligible for an increase?
    • What do I need to do to be considered/to be eligible for a pay increase?

    Practise makes perfect

    It pays to practise before your performance review to prepare yourself for any questions that may arise, preferably by practising with another person.  Practising in advance will also make you feel more confident and increase your chances of a positive outcome.

    Good luck with your salary negotiations!
    If you would like professional help with preparing for your performance review or any other form of negotiation, please do not hesitate to contact us.

    Are you responsible for holding salary appraisals?
    Leading performance appraisals, salary negotiations or holding disciplinary meetings in English can be a huge challenge for non-native speakers. We have extensive experience of coaching managers and HR staff at large and small companies on the many challenges they face and how to deal with them effectively and diplomatically in English. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition.

    You may also be interested in:
    10 negotiation terms you should know in English
    How to win over your international negotiation partners - a free webinar by the London School of International Communication, tomorrow, 11 October, 3pm CEST. Learn how to minimise resistance and increase your chance of a successful international negotiation.
    info
  • 2016-10-05 10:35Language, Business English

    8 tips for successful international negotiations in English


    English may be the default international business language but using English for international negotiations is far from uncomplicated. This is particularly true when the stakes are high and one or more parties have a language other than English as their first language. This can easily result in an imbalance in negotiating power, poor communication and ultimately, failure to reach agreement. To increase the likelihood of successful international negotiations, we recommend that you keep in mind these eight essential pointers.

    1. Keep it simple
    Language used should be clear and basic to help avoid misunderstanding. Use simple words wherever possible.

    2. No showing off
    Avoid idiomatic expressions, nuances and jargon as they can be very challenging or even impossible for some to understand. Any form of linguistic styling also runs the risk of being interpreted as “showing off” and being disrespectful. Unless all parties in the negotiation have a very high level of English, international negotiations are not the time to showcase your full vocabulary.

    3. Speak in short sentences and short segments
    It’s harder to process information in another language. Avoid information overload by speaking in short sentences and give people time to digest your information and proposals.

    4. Use visual aids wherever possible
    A picture is worth a thousand words and is usually the best way to communicate information.

    5. Take plenty of breaks
    International negotiations are usually challenging and tiring. Make sure you build in plenty of time for breaks to ensure people have the energy to stay focused.

    6. Allow frequent opportunities to ask questions

    When a lot of information is presented, it’s very important to allow plenty of opportunities for people to pose questions to ensure they really understand. Don’t wait for questions to be asked but stop and invite questions on a regular basis.

    7. Get a professional interpreter

    If there is any risk of negotiations failing due to lack of English skills, ensure that a qualified interpreter is available.

    8. Always provide a written summary

    When the negotiations have finished, send a written summary of the discussion, even if nothing was formally agreed.

    Good luck with your negotiations!


    If you would like professional help with preparing for upcoming negotiations with experienced coaches, please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on Tel +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information.

    You may also be interested in:

    How to win over your international negotiation partners - a free webinar by the London School of International Communication on 11 October, 3pm CEST. Learn how to minimise resistance and increase your chance of a successful international negotiation. Register here
    10 negotiation terms you should know in English

    info
  • 2016-09-29 07:53Business English, Language

    10 negotiation terms you should know in English


    Negotiation and bargaining are an essential part of working life. Even if you don’t work in politics or direct sales, negotiating and bargaining skills are frequently required to ensure that you receive fair compensation for your performance and for the type and amount of work that you do. Negotiation usually feels more difficult if you are doing it in another language so we’ve put together some important terms you should know in English.

    1. Alternatives
    Meaning: Other options.
    Example: We can't afford to pay the price you have proposed but let's discuss some other alternatives.

    2. Arbitration
    Meaning: A conflict that is addressed by using a neutral third party.
    Example: It would be much better if we could work this out between us as formal arbitration will be very expensive.

    3. Bottom-line
    Meaning: The lowest (price) a person is willing to accept.
    Example: I'll accept a 10% salary increase but that's my bottom-line.

    4. Compensate
    Meaning: To make up for a loss.
    Example: If you are willing to work late we will compensate you by paying overtime.

    5. Compromise
    Meaning: To change one's mind/terms/position slightly in order to reach agreement.
    Example: This wasn’t part of our plan but we are willing to compromise on this matter if it means that you will stay on-board with the project.

    6. Deadlock
    Meaning: To have reached a point where neither party will give in.
    Example: When the discussions came to a deadlock we decided to move to arbitration.

    7. High-ball /Low-ball
    Meaning: Highball: To make a request that is much higher than you expect to receive.
    Meaning: Lowball: To offer something much lower than you think the party/person you are negotiating with will ask for.
    Example: It’s sometimes a good idea to high-ball salary expectations when applying for a job as you can always negotiate downwards afterwards to reach a compromise.
    Example: I was expecting my boss to low-ball his opening offer during our annual salary review meeting.

    8. Leverage
    Meaning: Bargaining power - something that gives one party a greater chance at succeeding over another.
    Example: We have a lot of leverage because we are the only members of staff who can actually work this weekend.

    9. Mutual
    Meaning: To be agreed by both or all parties involved.
    Example: The decision to end the partnership was mutual.

    10. Trade-off
    Meaning: Terms that are offered in return for something else.
    Example: We managed to negotiate higher salaries but the trade-off was shorter term contracts.

    How comfortable are you in international negotiations?
    If you get frustrated when international negotiations don’t go as smoothly as you had planned, why not sign up for How to win over your international negotiation partners”. This free webinar by the London School of International Communication will be held on 11 October at 3pm CEST.

    Watch out too for our upcoming article on international negotiations.


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-08-30 10:14Language, Business English

    10 working relationship phrases you should know


    How good are the relationships that you have with your colleagues?

    We all know that good work relationships make for a happier work place. Human beings are naturally social creatures – so it makes sense that the better our relationships are at work, the happier and more productive we're going to be. Whilst we don’t have to be good friends with everyone at work, it is important to be able to work together, which requires mutual respect and understanding. Here are a list of common phrases in English which we hope you find helpful.

    Idioms which describe good work relationships

    1. To see eye to eye (to be able to agree)
    2. To keep on someone’s good side (to maintain favour with someone)
    3. To get off on the right foot with someone (to start a relationship well)
    4. To get on with someone (to have a good relationship)
    5. To be on the same page (to understand each other and agree)
    6. To get in with someone (to be liked by someone)
    7. To rub someone the right way (to create a good impression)
    8. To rub along well together (to have a good relationship)
    9. To get on like a house on fire (to have a very good relationship)
    10. To be on the same wavelength (to understand each other/to have a good relationship)


    Most of the above expressions can also be easily negated to describe bad working relationships instead.

    Idioms which describe bad work relationships

    1. Not to see eye to eye
    2. Not to keep on someone’s good side/To get on the wrong side of someone
    3. Not to get off on the right foot /To get off on the wrong foot
    4. Not to get on with someone/To fall out with someone
    5. Not to be on the same page
    6. Not to get in with someone
    7. Not to rub someone the right way/ To rub someone the wrong way
    8. Not to rub along well together/To fall out with someone
    9. To be/fight like cats and dogs (to be opposites who argue)
    10. Not to be on the same wavelength


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-08-22 09:40Language, Business English, How to series

    How to clarify things on a phone call in English


    It’s easy to get confused or even slightly panicked if you are not used to speaking English on the phone and you need to have an important conversation. Communicating and listening on the telephone can be particularly challenging if the quality of the connection is poor or if the person you are talking to speaks quickly or has an accent that you are not used to hearing. It’s also normal to feel slightly thrown by a new word that you do not understand. Here are some phrases you can use if you run into difficulty.

    Difficulty hearing?


    “I’m sorry, but could you speak up a little?”
    “I didn’t quite hear that, sorry, can you say that again?”
    “I didn’t catch that last bit. Can you say it again please?”

    Difficulty understanding?


    “Could you speak more slowly, please?”
    “Could you repeat that, please?”
    “Would you mind spelling that for me, please?”
    “Could you explain that in another way, please?”
    “I’m afraid I didn’t get that”

    Wondering how to clarify spelling in English?


    See our previous article on how to spell in English about the NATO phonetic alphabet, also known as the ICAO phonetic or spelling alphabet and the ITU phonetic alphabet.

    Need to get end a conversation?


    If you are having severe problems, you might want to give up and try again later. But how do you do that without losing face and/or causing offence? Here are some ways to end a telephone conversation quickly, which also leave it open for you to have another attempt at a later point or to try communicating in writing instead.

    “I’m afraid the connection isn’t very good”
    “I’m entering a tunnel and will probably lose the signal”
    “I’m afraid the battery is about to run out on my phone so I may lose you”
    Followed by
    -“May I call you back another time/a bit later?”
    Or
    -“Could you please confirm what you just said in writing/by email?”

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-08-03 10:35Business English, Language

    Back in the saddle or back to the salt mines?

    Back to work already after the summer holidays or perhaps your holidays are coming to an end? Re-entry to the work place is rarely easy after a fun filled break.

    How you express yourself when you get back to work will set the tone for the months to come.


    Here are some positive English expressions about getting back into work mode which you can use. We’ve also listed a few common sayings with a negative nuance which are best avoided to prevent all the energy and optimism you felt on holiday from evaporating.

    Positive expressions

    It feels good to be back in the saddle
    It’s good to get back into the swing of things
    It’s great to gear up again/ get into gear again
    I’m refreshed and ready to go again
    My batteries are completely recharged
    I’m firing on all four cylinders and ready for action

    Negative expressions

    It’s back to the salt mines
    Nose to the grindstone again
    Back to the grind

    Good luck with getting back into work mode!

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-07-15 10:16Business English, Language

    20 ways to exit turbulent politics


    It’s been a dramatic few weeks in British politics. Not only have many politicians fallen or been pushed following the result of the Brexit referendum, the new Prime Minister has now cleaned out most of the cabinet and announced her new appointments.

    There are many ways to describe an exit from politics, from fairly neutral descriptions to more nuanced forms with connotations of failure, weakness or being outplayed.

    Fairly neutral

    1. Resigning
    2. Withdrawing
    3. Walking away
    4. Standing down/aside
    5. Handing in one’s resignation
    6. Retiring
    7. Bowing out
    8. Relinquishing power

    Negative connotation – suggestion of weakness/failure

    9. Getting fired
    10. Throwing in the towel
    11. Giving up
    12. Quitting
    13. Capitulating
    14. Abandoning ship
    15. Bailing out
    16. Dropping out
    17. Pulling out

    Also negative connotation - being pushed, hijacked or outplayed

    18. Getting knifed /stabbed in the back
    19. Falling on your own sword
    20. Being out-manoeuvred

    If you need help formulating your organisation’s response to Britain’s withdrawal from the EU and how you may be affected, please do not hesitate to contact us.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-06-22 12:14Business English, Language

    Winners, losers and making a comeback

    Brexit and football are dominating the news and media this week. One thing they have in common is that in any referendum or competition, there is always a winning and losing side.

    There are many different ways of expressing victory and defeat, whether a decisive outcome or a result with the narrowest of margins. A lot of these expressions are derived from sports but are also used in business, politics and wider contexts. We hope you find the following collection helpful.

    Victory
    A (big/colossal/decisive) win
    A successful outcome
    A landslide victory
    A triumph
    A (complete) conquest
    A success
    A positive outcome
    A clean sweep
    To gain the upper hand
    To sweep the board
    Sports related
    -A home run
    -Grand slam
    -Hole in one
    -Bull’s eye
    -To romp home
    -Winning side
    -Walkover
    -Game, set and match


    A narrow win

    A close call
    A narrow escape
    By the narrowest of margins
    To win by a hair’s breadth
    Sports related
    A photo finish
    Neck and neck

    A surprising or lucky outcome
    A fluke
    A surprising turn of events
    To get lucky
    A godsend

    To make a comeback

    To rally
    To recover
    To rebound
    To gain new momentum
    A resurgence of energy
    A turnaround
    To show clear signs of improvement

    Defeat
    A (big/humiliating/embarrassing) defeat
    A (big/huge) loss
    Trounced
    Whipped
    Licked
    Punished (at the ballot box)
    Sports related
    -To strike out

    A narrow defeat

    Sports related
    Pipped at the post

    May the best sides win!


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-06-11 12:54Business English, Language

    5 football metaphors used in business

    To help mark the start of UEFA Euro 2016 today we would like to share some soccer metaphors which are frequently used in business.

    1. Kick off
    Football meaning: The start of the match.
    Business meaning: The start of any event.
    E.g. what time does the conference kick off?

    2. Moving the goal posts
    Football meaning: Hopefully this never physically happens but it can mean for example that rules are changed after a tournament starts.
    Business meaning: Criteria are changed after a goal has been set.
    E.g. it was unfair to move the goal posts on the bonus system.

    3. Level playing field

    Football meaning: It’s difficult to play a match if a pitch slopes or is tilted in one direction.
    Business meaning: If a person or group has an advantage over others from the start, it’s not a level playing field.
    E.g. we extended the length of the application period to ensure a level playing field.

    4. Shown the red card

    Football meaning: A referee sends a player off the field by showing him the red card.
    Business meaning: To be excluded from an event or activity or even fired.
    E.g. Peter was shown the red card after behaving inappropriately at the office party.

    5. Own goal
    Football meaning: A goal scored by a member of a team against his/her own team.
    Business meaning: Self-inflicted damage to a person or to his/her organisation
    E.g. He scored an own goal by presenting so badly.

    We wish England, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Sweden and Wales the very best of luck in the European championship! So many teams to cheer for……..good odds!

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-05-26 12:43Culture, Language, How to series, Business English

    How to weigh in on the Brexit debate


    There is no escaping the subject of Brexit
    It’s the second time the British electorate has been asked to vote on the issue of European Union membership: the first was held in 1975, when it was known as the EEC. Membership was approved in that referendum by 67% of voters. On 23rd June, it’s up to the British voters again to decide their relationship with Europe.

    Taking sides in English

    Discussing politics in another language is usually a lot harder than other subjects. Whatever your opinion, it’s important that you can express it clearly. The easiest way of doing this is to take the lead from what has already been said and to agree or disagree with this. There are numerous different ways of doing this and this article outlines some ways of weighing in and sounding good in the process.


    1. In favour of vs Against
    E.g. I am in favour of Brexit/ I am against Brexit

    2. Pro vs Anti
    E.g. I am pro- EU/ I am anti-EU

    3. Supporters vs Opponents
    E.g. I am a staunch supporter of Brexit/ I am a staunch opponent of Brexit. Alternatively, I support/oppose Brexit

    4. To Welcome vs To find unacceptable
    E.g. I welcome the proposed terms/ I find the current terms unacceptable

    5. Accept vs Reject
    E.g. I  accept the idea of a unified Europe/ I reject the idea of a unified Europe

    6. Agree vs Disagree
    E.g. I agree with most of what you said but…../ I completely disagree with you because…..

    7. Praise vs Criticise
    E.g. I praise the new initiatives/ I am very critical of the new initiatives

    8. Applaud vs Condemn
    E.g. I applaud David Cameron’s stance on Europe/ I condemn his stance on Europe

    9. Celebrate vs Denounce
    E.g. I think the new proposals should be celebrated/denounced

    10. Allies vs Detractors
    E.g. Allies of Brexit would agree with that /EU detractors would slam those proposals

    Check out our previous article: How to talk Brexit – 10 Rs that you should learn

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-05-18 13:48How to series, Language, Business English

    How to talk Brexit – 10 Rs that you should learn

    Where does the word come from?
    Brexit is an abbreviation of "British exit" and mirrors the term Grexit ("Greek exit"). It refers to the possibility of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union, currently a hotly debated topic in both the UK and the rest of Europe.

    10 R’s that will get you through any discussion in English on Brexit
    Brexit is a complex subject which we plan to address in a series or articles. First up is an easy glossary list that should help you participate in any discussion or debate that you happen to get involved in.

    1. Renegotiation ( e.g. Renegotiating terms)
    2. Referendum (e.g. A referendum has been promised)
    3. Redefining ( e.g. Redefining Britain’s relationship with Europe)
    4. Relationship (e.g. Relationship with other European countries)
    5. Reform (e.g. Reform of legal rights)
    6. Realism/Reality /Realistic (e.g. How realistic is Brexit?)
    7. Risk (e.g. Leaving the European Union is not without risk)
    8. Retention (e.g. Retaining/retention of national sovereignty.)
    9. Rights (e.g. What rights would be lost?)
    10. Repercussions (e.g. What would be the repercussions of Brexit?)

    Bonus points for alliteration
    An added benefit to learning these 10 R’s is that they also combine well, which will give you additional style points for alliteration.

    E.g. A referedum raises the issues of reform and redefining and renegotiating Britain’s relationship with the rest of Europe. It also raises the questions of rights, risks and repercussions.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-05-12 13:24Language, Business English

    8 double-edged words you should avoid on your CV


    Most words have more than one meaning. When it comes work situations, you need to choose your words carefully, especially when you are presenting yourself for the first time.

    Certain attributes and characteristics may be celebrated and popular in films and in the media but are actually rather risky choices when it comes to CVs and interviews. You may think that the word "go-getter", for example, conjures up a positive image. However, this word could easily be interpreted as aggressive by those screening your CV and an undesirable characteristic in a potential new colleague. Here's a list of 8 other risky words which are best avoided in job applications.

    1. Single minded

    Can be interpreted as overly focused.

    2. Strong willed

    The risk posed by this word is that it can interpreted as the opposite of the ever-popular Swedish characteristic “lyhörd” (responsive).

    3. Relentless
    Risks being interpreted in the same negative ways as numbers 1 and 2 above. Also risks being  viewed as someone who is overly-determined, uncompromising and difficult to work with.

    4. Meticulous
    Can be interpreted as someone who is overly fussy and too focused on detail.

    5. Guru
    These adjectives are very subjective and could easily be interpreted as boasting. It's also better to describe your accomplishments in detail than to use sweeping terms of self-praise.

    6. Unconventional

    Although this word usually implies brilliance in lead characters in movies, in a work situation it can be interpreted negatively as someone who is a risk taker or who plays by their own rules.

    7. Assertive

    This characteristic can be interpreted as an aggressive person; unfortunately this is particularly true when used in relation to women.

    8. Extrovert
    This attribute can be viewed as someone who is overbearing or just too much.

    Need help with writing or editing your CV in English?

    Please do not hesitate to contact us.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.

    info
  • 2016-04-26 08:38Culture, Business English, Language

    Advise or advice?

    What's the difference between advise and advice?

    Quite a big difference actually, as one is a verb and the other is a noun. Both words sound and are spelled very similarly, which is the reason that many native English speakers also confuse them. Take our quick quiz to test your English and see if you can make the important distinction between 'advise' and 'advice'.

    Take our quick quiz


    1. The doctor did not________me of the  possible side effects of the medication.
    2. The company's legal representative would like to offer you some ________.
    3. The travel agent ________them not to travel to Brussels.  
    4. Following a number of break-ins, the police sent a letter to all home owners  __________them to be vigilant.
    5. What sort of ________ would you offer to your friend in this situation?
    6. The bank issued a debit _______after he withdrew the money.

    Answers

    1. advise
    2. advice
    3. advised
    4. advising
    5. advice
    6. advice

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-04-13 10:16Courses, Business English, Language

    Shakespeare for business: 10 quotes every business leader should read

    As part of our celebration of Shakespeare's 400 year anniversary on April 23rd, we've gathered some of the great bard's timeless wisdom and insight into human nature, as relevant in today's business world as ever before.

    1. Resilience
    “Wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss, but cheerily seek how to redress their harms.”
       — Henry VI. Act v. Sc. iv.

    2. Self-confidence
    “Our doubts are traitors and cause us to miss the good we oft might win, by fearing to attempt.”
    —Measure for Measure, Act I  scene iv.

    3. Authenticity
    “This above all, to thine own self be true, and it must follow as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.”
       —Hamlet, Act I , sc iii

    4. Insight
    The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.
         — As You Like It, Act V, sc. i

    5. Honesty
    No legacy is so rich as honesty.
         — All's Well that Ends Well, Act III, sc. v

    6. Money management
    Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
    For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
    And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
         — Hamlet, Act I, sc. iii

    7.  Time off
    If all the year were playing holidays,
    To sport would be as tedious as to work.
         — Henry IV, Part 1, Act I, sc. ii

    8. The danger of making excuses
    And oftentimes excusing of a fault
    Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.
         — King John, Act IV, sc. ii

    9.  Moving forward
    What's done cannot be undone.
         — Macbeth, Act V, sc. i

    10. Making  choices
    There's small choice in rotten apples.
         — The Taming of the Shrew, Act I, sc. i

    You might also be interested in reading Shakespeare As you Like It - In Stockholm, Uppsala or even London or Shakespeare on Friendship.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-03-22 09:37Language, Business English

    20 tax terms in English you should know


    It's that time of the year again. If you have electronic identification (eID) you can complete your Swedish tax returns online from today, 22nd March.

    We’ve tried to make tax terminology a little less taxing by putting together a list of common terms that you should know in case you need to discuss the subject, or even to files tax returns in English some day. We hope you find the list helpful.

    1. Skatteverket: HM Revenue and Customs (formerly called Inland Revenue) – UK. IRS (Internal Revenue Service ) – USA.
    2. Att deklarera: To complete/submit/file tax returns
    3. Skattskyldig: Liable to tax
    4. Skattesatser: Tax rates
    5. Skatteavdrag: Tax deduction
    6. Avdragsgilla: Deductible
    7. Källbeskattning: Deduction at source
    8. Skattebefrielse: Tax exemption
    9. Skattesmitningen: Tax evasion
    10. Skattebedrägeri: Tax fraud
    11. Skattekryphål: Tax loophole
    12. Skatteparadis: Tax haven
    13. Förmåner: Benefits
    14. Moms: VAT (Value Added Tax)
    15. Bolagsskatt: Corporation tax
    16. Skattefrågor: Tax issues
    17. Skatteåterbäring: Tax refund
    18. Skatterabatt: Tax rebate
    19. Skattebördan: Tax burden
    20. Svartarbete: The black economy

    Good luck with your tax returns!

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-03-07 11:44Business English, Language

    15 English words you should have on your CV

    Estimates provided by recruiters on how long they spend looking at a CV before discarding it vary between 6 seconds and 2 minutes. That's a very short time to decide your employment future.

    You need to include the words that recruiters are actively scanning for, rather than old and tired phrases. Instead of using terms of self-praise like “team player”  and “dynamic ”,  it's far better to  describe your accomplishments specifically. Use words like “improved”  and  “created” and provide a specific explanation of exactly what you did, including numbers whenever possible. In other words, instead of saying you are results-driven, show the results you achieved.

    The words recruiters are looking for

    1. Achieved
    2. Improved
    3. Trained/mentored
    4. Managed
    5. Created
    6. Resolved
    7. Volunteered
    8. Influenced
    9. Increased/decreased
    10. Ideas
    11. Negotiated
    12. Launched
    13. Revenue/profits
    14. Under budget
    15. Won

    And the over-used words that make recruiters yawn

    1. Results-driven
    2. Team player
    3. Bottom-line
    4. Hard worker
    5. Strategic thinker
    6. Dynamic
    7. Self-motivated
    8. Detail-oriented
    9. Proactive
    10. Track record

    Need help with writing or editing your CV in English?

    Please do not hesitate to contact us.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-02-24 12:53Language, Business English

    Is being called feisty a good thing?


    Women and men face double-standards

    Unfortunately, this even extends to language. Take for example how a certain type of behaviour is described. Men who put themselves forward at work are “assertive”, whereas women who do the same are often  described as “pushy” or “bossy".

    Some words are ever trickier than double-standards
    Those using them may think they are paying a compliment but the words can be interpreted as insulting or condescending. Feisty is such a word. Those who use it might think that the word conveys “spirited” but, depending on the context and the audience, the word may be interpreted as aggressive behaviour.

    What does the dictionary say?
    Most words have more than one meaning and different dictionaries also give varying definitions of the word feisty.

    Urban Dictionary- Excitable, spirited (can sometimes mean irritable or easy to anger). Example: She's a feisty little goddess. Typically used nowadays to describe a smallish woman who is either opinionated and aggressive or plucky and spirited.

    Merriam Webster- Not afraid to fight or argue : very lively and aggressive. Examples: The novel features a feisty heroine; Even her opponents admire her feisty spirit.

    Oxford Dictionary
    -(Of a person, typically one who is relatively small) lively, determined, and courageous. Example: A love story with a feisty heroine who’s more than a pretty face. Feisty can also mean touchy and aggressive. Example: He got a bit feisty and tried to hit me.

    The common thread is a sense of smallness or underdog status
    Context is always crucial when interpreting language. However, feisty is usually positive when used to describe women but has more negative connotations when used to describe men.

    Wondering how to describe yourself?
    Are you writing a CV or thinking about applying for a new job? Don't miss our upcoming article on the best English words to have on your CV.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-02-17 12:17Language, Business English

    Buttering up the boss in English


    Whether paying the boss a direct compliment or framing flattery as a question, you immediately know what your colleagues are up to when they try to butter up the boss.

    It may have everyone's teeth grinding at the office but the chances are that it's helping their careers.  More than doing the job well is required these days to get ahead  and a brilliant campaign of sucking up rarely goes amiss. Anyone who doubts whether sucking up works should read Marshall Goldsmiths blog post about the love we feel for our dogs, who are the most successful suckers-up ever.

    Whether it's something you aspire to or despise, as an integral part of office politics,  you should at least know how to describe this behaviour. Here are some alternatives you can use:

    8 polite phrases to describe buttering up behaviour

    1. Sweet talking the boss
    2. Sweetening up the boss
    3. Stroking the boss' ego
    4. Massaging the boss' ego

    Used a little more derogatively (nedsättande)

    5. Playing up to the boss
    6. Sucking up to the boss
    7. Laying it on thick
    8. Fawning over the boss

    For more advice on communications in English, please do not hesitate to contact us.

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2016-02-02 11:57Business English, Language, How to series

    Nice ways to say you're wrong in English


    Making mistakes is a normal part of life but how this is communicated can build or break relationships. Learning how to diplomatically point out that someone is wrong, or has made a mistake, is challenging, to say the least. We've put together some useful tips including synonyms for mistakes and smart tactics for softening the blow.

    Nice words for mistakes and problems

    • oversight

    • slip up

    • hiccup

    • confusion

    • bump

    • hurdle


    Always use modifiers to make things seem less or smaller

    • slight

    • little

    • a bit of

    • minor

    • a few


    Examples

    • This may create a slight hurdle for us

    • There's been a little confusion about x

    • It seems there was a bit of an oversight regarding x

    • It looks like we may have hit a bump with x

    • There are a few sections of the report that need to be changed

    • A minor slip up has surfaced

    • There have been a few hiccups along the way


    Avoid saying "you" to the person who made the mistake

    • There's been an oversight

    • There may have been some confusion

    • It seems like we've hit a bump


    Make positive suggestions instead of directly pointing out the mistake


    • Let's recheck the statement together

    • Let's look at it again later as it needs a little revision

    • We'll need to make a few minor adjustments/amendments


    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2015-10-26 11:20Business English, Language, Swinglish series

    10 Swedish sayings that are guaranteed to confuse English speakers

    Ever met by baffled expressions when you try to use Swedish sayings when speaking English? Using proverbs shows linguistic skill but can also go badly wrong. Some Swedish sayings are international while others just don’t translate at all to English. As part of our “Borta med svengelska” series we’ve compiled some Swedish proverbs that work in English as well those that don’t and those that just need a little translating polish to make them sound right. First up is a list of 10 Swedish proverbs that you should avoid altogether, or better still, learn the English equivalent if you would really like to impress. Don’t forget to like us on facebook and linkedin to make sure you catch the rest of the series.

    1. Gör inte en höna av en fjäder

    Direct translation: Don’t make a hen out of a feather
    English equivalent: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill

    2. Lika barn lekar bäst

    Direct translation: Similar children play best
    English equivalent: Birds of a feather flock together

    3. Arga katter får rivet skinn

    Direct translation: Angry cats get scratched skin
    English equivalent: Quarrelsome dogs come limping home

    4. Smaken är som baken, delad
    Direct translation: Taste is like the buttocks, divided
    English equivalent: There’s no accounting for taste, or alternatively,Beauty is in the eye of the beholder

    5. Den enes död, den andres bröd

    Direct translation: The death of one, the bread of the other
    English equivalent: One man’s meat is another man’s poison

    6. Köp inte grisen i säcken

    Direct translation: Don’t buy the pig in the bag
    Closest English equivalent: Let the buyer have a thousand eyes for the seller wants only one

    7. Lagt kort ligger

    Direct translation: Laid card lies
    English equivalent: You can’t un-ring a bell

    8. Eget beröm luktar illa
    Direct translation: Self-praise smells bad
    English equivalent: Don’t blow your own horn

    9. Först till kvarn får först mala
    Direct translation: First to the mill will grind first
    English equivalent: First come, first served

    10 Man ska inte döma hunden efter håren
    Direct translation: You should not judge a dog by its fur
    English equivalent: Never judge a book by its cover

    If you need help with swinglish issues or guidance on professional international communications, please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
    info
  • 2015-10-16 10:25Language, Business English

    8 rugby metaphors used in business

    Check out the quarter finals of the Rugby World Cup 2015 this weekend. Sadly, host country England has been knocked out but you can catch some exciting action as Argentina, Australia, France, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland, South Africa and Wales battle it out. Why not also check out these 8 well known rugby metaphors which are frequently used in business

    A safe pair of hands


    Sports use: Someone who is good at catching the ball and rarely drops it

    Business use: Someone who doesn’t make many mistakes

    Example: We hired him as we thought he would be a safe pair of hands

    A hospital pass

    Sports use: A pass made to a team-mate who will clearly be tackled heavily as soon as the ball is received

    Business use: Giving someone a task that they are very likely to fail at

    Example: Giving Jack responsibility for health and safety was a hospital pass

    Kick for touch

    Sports use: A safe option. You can gain ground without risk – particularly useful when you can’t think of anything better to do

    Business use: Giving a safe answer and not really answering the question

    Example: The chief executive kicked for touch when asked a question about the environmental impact

    No pushover

    Sports use: A team with a strong scrum can score a try by pushing the other team over their end line

    Business use: Proving that you can’t easily be set aside

    Example: The leadership debate proved that he was no pushover

    Wrong footed

    Sports use: When a player tries to block an opponent but is caught by surprise when the opponent changes direction

    Business Use: Using surprise tactics on the competition

    Example: Intersport was wrong footed by Stadium’ s new marketing campaign

    Scrum

    Sports use: A scrum is when players from one team engage with eight players from the other team and everyone pushes

    Business use: A group of people who take on someone/another group

    Example: The prime minister was greeted by a media scrum outside his office

    Carry the ball

    Sports use: The ball can be carried to advance towards the end line to score a try (points)

    Business use: Used to describe someone who takes on responsibility and moves forward

    Example: She will make a great leader and have a successful career as she’s used to carrying the ball

    Drop the ball

    Sports use: The ball is dropped allowing the opposition to take possession

    Business use: Used to describe someone who makes mistakes or misses an opportunity

    Example: We didn’t hire him as we heard he has a tendency to drop the ball

    If you are interested in finding out about more sports metaphors in English please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel.  +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se
    info
  • 2015-09-22 15:28Business English, Language

    5 essential elements for automatic replies in English

    It's a short text to let people know you are out of the office. How hard can it be - right? Unfortunately, we come across incoherent and badly spelt texts all the time. Here's a simple and effective check list to put a professional out of office text together and some sample messages in English.

    Checklist for out of office texts

     Thank the sender for his/her message
     Explain how long you will be unavailable
     Explain who to contact during your absence
     Specify your return date
     ALWAYS use spell check and proofread your text

    Some sample messages

    Example 1:

    Thank you for your email. I’m out of the office and will be back on (Date of Return). During this period I will have limited access to my email.

    For immediate assistance, please contact me on my mobile phone on (Your mobile phone number).

    Best Regards,
    [Your Name]

    Example 2:

    Thank you for your message. I will be out of the office starting (Starting Date) and returning (Date of Return).

    If you need immediate assistance during my absence, please contact (Contact's Name) at (Contact's Email Address). Otherwise I will respond to your email as soon as possible upon my return.

    Warm Regards,
    [Your Name]

    Need help with communicating professionally in English? Please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se
    info
  • 2015-09-16 15:53Language, Business English

    Nice ways to say you're sick

    Looking for a little variation on a tired theme? Here are some polite ways of informing your employer that you are unwell.

    1. I'm feeling a bit under the weather

    2. I'm a little off colour

    3. I'm a little peaky

    4. I am not myself /feeling myself

    5. I feel a bit funny

    6. I feel a little out of sorts

    7. I am indisposed

    8. I don't feel too good

    Need help with communicating diplomatically in English?
    Please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se.
    info
  • 2015-09-14 15:58Business English, Language

    How to spell on the phone in English

    Y as in Ylva and S as in Sigurd -  Familiar with the confusion this usually causes? Spelling on the phone in English can be tricky, especially when it comes to names and email addresses. Learn the following list of 26 words and never be misunderstood again.

    The list constitutes The International Radiotelephony Spelling Alphabet, commonly known as the NATO phonetic alphabet and also known as the ICAO phonetic or spelling alphabet and the ITU phonetic alphabet. It is the standard English spelling alphabet.

    A Alfa

    B Bravo

    C Charlie

    D Delta

    E Echo

    F Foxtrot

    G Golf

    H Hotel

    I India

    J Juliett

    K Kilo

    L Lima

    M Mike

    N November

    O Oscar

    P Papa

    Q Quebec

    R Romeo

    S Sierra

    T Tango

    U Uniform

    V Victor

    W Whisky

    X X-ray

    Y Yankee

    Z Zulu

    Need help with communicating professionally in English?
    Please do not hesitate to contact us at The London School of English  on tel. +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se
    info
  • 2015-05-27 15:21Language, Business English

    10 words you should have on your English CV

    Whatever your field of specialisation and regardless of your chosen industry or business sector, there are certain key general competencies that are essential for successful working. We've listed the key characteristics that employers are currently looking for, along with some alternative forms to help you work these words into your CV and letter of application

    1. Tenacious
    Alternative forms: to have tenacity / to demonstrate perseverance / to have staying power / to possess the ability to hang in and work under pressure
    2. Trouble shooter
    Alternative forms:  to trouble shoot / to solve problems
    3. Influencer
    Alternative forms: to influence / to persuade/ to be persuasive / to have powers of persuasion
    4. Initiator
    Alternative forms: to initiate / show initiative / to be proactive / to work proactively
    5. Negotiator
    Alternative forms: to negotiate / to have negotiation skills / to mediate/ to have the ability to mediate
    6. Innovator
    Alternative forms: to be innovative /to be a pioneer / to innovate / to be inventive
    7. Self-motivated
    Alternative form: to be a self-starter
    8. Commercially aware
    Alternative forms: to have commercial awareness /to demonstrate business acumen
    9. Communicator
    Alternative forms: to communicate well / to have communication skills
    10. Team player
    Alternative form: to have a team focus

    Good luck with your job application. If you need help preparing for an interview in English or with proofreading services, please do not hesitate to contact us on tel.  +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se
    info
  • 2015-04-28 15:42Business English, How to series

    How to ace your interview in English- Part 2

    Following on from the first part of this article last week, here are five more of our top tips for preparing for your interview in English.

    1. Learn phrases
    Don’t just look up words. Learn how to put new words in appropriate phrases. There is nothing impressive sounding about complicated words used incorrectly.

    2. Check your material
    Make sure that the material you study is correct. Practise does not make perfect if you are learning and repeating mistakes. Enlist the help of a native English speaker if you can.

    3. Prepare “why you are a perfect fit for the job”

    This is a list of points (achievements and skills) you want to make sure you put across during the interview, even if the question isn’t asked directly.

    4. Submerge yourself in English before the interview
    Try to submerge yourself in English before the interview to get in the zone. The best way to do this is by speaking English, preferably with a native speaker. If this is not an option, surround yourself by English media.

    5. Body language

    For all our emphasis on language skills, about 70% of what we communicate comes from our body language. Preparation of what you are going to say is key for building interview confidence, but filming yourself is also extremely valuable. A great video to check out on this subject is Amy Cuddy’s Ted Talk on “Your body language shapes who you are”.

    Best of luck with your interview!

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000 or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2015-03-09 13:28Swinglish series, Business English, Language

    5 Common Swinglish Mistakes on CVs


    English can be very tricky, especially when it’s important to get it right. This is particularly true when writing a CV. As the saying goes, you only get one chance to make a first impression. Short and condensed CVs require concise writing, which usually highlights translation errors. Use spellcheck tools wisely and, if possible, get a native English speaker to proofread your CV for you.

    1. Incorrect translation of the word “kunskap”

    The literal translation of “kunskap” is “knowledge”, but this is often not the right word to use. Consider whether one of the following words would be a better fit:
    • Skills/Skills set
    • Competence
    • Experience
    • A solid grounding in
    • A solid understanding of
    • Information

    2. Incorrect translation of the word “möjlighet”
    The direct translation of “possibility” is another word that is often incorrectly used on CVs and application letters. Consider the following options instead:
    • Ability
    • Opportunity
    • Chance
    • Capacity
    • Capability
    • Potential
    • Method
    • Way

    3. Prepositions
    Prepositions are usually one of the most challenging aspects of learning another language. One mistake, however, comes up time and time again on CVs when referring to results achieved; the use of the preposition “with” instead of “by”.

    Swinglish: Increased/decreased/raised/fell “with” X%
    English: Increased/decreased/raised/ fell “by” X%

    4. Misuse of the word “branch”
    “Bransch” in Swedish refers to an industry or business
    “Branch” in English means filial or avdelningskontor

    5. Overuse of the word “competence”
    The word “competence”, which is the direct translation of the Swedish word “kompetens” is not used at all as often in English as its Swedish counterpart. Try substituting one of the following words instead:
    • Skills
    • Skill set
    • Experience

    If you would like professional help with writing, editing or proofreading your CV or other English texts, please do not hesitate to contact us.  

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
  • 2015-02-19 13:40Swinglish series, Business English

    5 basic Swinglish Mistakes to avoid on your CV


    Finding the right words and nuance are difficult when writing a CV in another language. However, there is no real excuse for basic mistakes, especially if you claim to command the language well enough to be considered for the job. We’ve listed some of the most common basic mistakes we come across when proofreading CVs.

    1. Days and months: The days of the week, Monday, Tuesday etc., and months of the year, January, February, March, etc., are ALWAYS written with capital letters.

    2. Names should also have capital letters e.g. Stockholm University

    3. Dates: add the word “in” when referring to dates. Swinglish: I was born 1970. English: I was born in 1970. Swinglish: 1990 I studied in London. English: In 1990, I studied in London.

    4. “Address” is written with two 'd’s.

    5. Verb forms: Few things are as grating to an English speaker as using the incorrect form of the verb e.g. “is” instead of “are” or “was” instead of “were”. It is also one of the most common mistakes that Swedes make in English and is prevalent even amongst those with a very high level of English.
    Tip: if you are using the third person singular (i.e. he/she/it), check that you have an “s” at the end of the verb, for example he/she/it writes. Other forms (i.e. I, you, we, they) do not have an “s” at the end of the verb,

    Don’t forget to check your LinkedIn profile for errors as this is just as important as any CV you send to prospective employers.

    If you would like professional help with writing, editing or proofreading your CV or other English texts, please do not hesitate to contact us.   

    The London School of English offers high quality English language training for motivated adults from all professional backgrounds. We give you the tools and skills you need to communicate successfully in your field of expertise and to expand your business and career opportunities. Call us on +46 8 5999 4000or email us at info@londonschool.se for more information about our tailored tuition or simply take our online test to check your English level.
    info
Login